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On empathy and it's importance moving forward
#1
Part One

"What Unites Us: Reflections on Patriotism" is a recent book written by famed journalist, Dan Rather.  I haven't read it yet in its entirety, but I fully intend to after a good friend shared with me this excerpt on the importance of empathy.  If you choose not to read all of this soapbox posting, I hope you will at least read the excerpt from Rather's book and take a few moments to reflect on the role empathy has played in the advancement of humankind and how, sometimes, the lack of empathy has hindered it.

Here is an excerpt from the ...uh, excerpt, Rather's remembrance of the people in his boyhood depression era neighborhood helping each other in times of need:

"The neighborhood tried as best it could to help these families stay alive. If we had leftovers after supper, we would walk them across the street. One of my earliest impressions was taking that short journey with my father. You might think that these families were humiliated by the offerings, but there is no dignity in being hungry. And there was no judgment or disdain on the part of those offering assistance. No one wondered why those neighbors weren’t working, and no one passed moral judgments on their inability to fend for themselves. We understood that in life, some are dealt aces, some tens, and some deuces."

The author recalled a lesson he learned about motivations for such kindnesses:

"So I asked my mother why we gave those families gifts at Christmas when we ourselves didn’t have much. I remember then answering for myself: 
“It was because we felt sorry for them, right?"
“We do not feel sorry for them,” my mother said sternly. “We understand how they feel.” 
It was a lesson that is so seared in my mind, I can see her face and I can hear her tone of voice as if it were yesterday."

Mr. Rather offers more examples of depression era hardships and empathetic neighborly assistance.  They are stories that similarly occurred in countless neighborhoods all across the nation.  As noted in the excerpt, empathy builds community and communities strengthen a nation along with its resolve.  It is this resolve, underestimated by the WW2 axis powers who perceived America as weakened and vulnerable, that enabled our nation to empathize with the victims of totalitarianism and to rise up and defeat it.  America did so not just for the benefit of the United States, but also for the whole of humanity.  Our nation did it because it empathized.  The author goes on to write:

"Indeed, this sweep of empathy continued after the war. One of the best foreign policy efforts in American history was to help rebuild Europe and Japan. Our enemies became our friends through an acknowledgment of the common bonds of humanity." 

"Today, these kinds of empathetic programs are associated with big government bureaucracies. There are legitimate questions about the manner in which they operate, and they could probably be improved. It is undeniable that they still do good work in bringing more fairness and justice to our democracy, but the spirit of empathy with which they were created has been lost. Empathy is a deeply personal emotion. It is about the feeling one has for one’s fellow human beings. Transferring responsibilities to government is often necessary but it creates a distance between us and those who need help. And if this impulse is left unchecked, it absolves us from our own responsibility as citizens to form a more empathetic union with others."

Talking about post-war legislation such as the TVA, the WPA, the creation of the SEC and the FLSA (Fair Labor Standards Act) Mr Rather writes "...and I don’t think it is coincidental that this happened as the children of the Great Depression and World War II grew into adulthood."

He continues with, perhaps, the most important points of the excerpt:

"Today, these kinds of empathetic programs are associated with big government bureaucracies. There are legitimate questions about the manner in which they operate, and they could probably be improved. It is undeniable that they still do good work in bringing more fairness and justice to our democracy, but the spirit of empathy with which they were created has been lost. Empathy is a deeply personal emotion. It is about the feeling one has for one’s fellow human beings. Transferring responsibilities to government is often necessary but it creates a distance between us and those who need help. And if this impulse is left unchecked, it absolves us from our own responsibility as citizens to form a more empathetic union with others.

"... When we live in a self-selected bubble of friends, neighbors, and colleagues, it is too easy to forget how important it is to try to walk in the shoes of others."

"... Warren Buffett once speculated about what would happen if, before birth, a genie gave us the opportunity to choose the political, economic, and social system into which we would be born. “What’s the catch?” he said. “One catch — just before you emerge [from the womb] you have to go through a huge bucket with seven billion slips, one for each human. Dip your hand in and that is what you get — you could be born intelligent or not intelligent, born healthy or disabled, born black or white, born in the U. S. or in Bangladesh, etc. You have no idea which slip you will get. Not knowing which slip you are going to get, how would you design the world?”

It is a wonderful thought experiment that lays out a provocative case for empathy. Mr. Buffett calls his construct “the ovarian lottery.” Now, take a moment to imagine the most sanctimonious of our current national voices. Imagine those who lecture most loudly about morality and personal responsibility from the perch of privilege. Imagine those who blame the victims of discrimination and poverty. How would these men and women fare in such a lottery as Mr. Buffett outlines? What would their message be if they themselves had been born under far different circumstances? These people are in dire need of humility, a humility bathed in the refreshing waters of empathy. We can all afford to drink more from that spring as well."


* * *

Part Two

I am not a duplicitous person.  Sometimes I am reserved and don't shoot off my mouth until I have a sense of how people will react, but I am not duplicitous.  What you read or hear from me is without ulterior motive.  The older I get the less concerned I become about other people's judgement of my thoughts and opinions.  That is not to say I have no respect for the opinions of others nor intentions of malice in presenting my own.  I'm simply more comfortable with presenting them than I was in my youth.  Having said that, I want to share a couple of experiences that tie in nicely with Dan Rather's excerpt on empathy.  The only person I've told these to before is my spouse.

First, fast forward through my early years all the way to second grade.  I don't even remember what they teach you in second grade.  I think that's where we built upon the 1st grade Dick and Jane reading skills, maybe got introduced to Dr. Seuss and the supervision at recess eased up enough to where not everything we said was within earshot of Mrs. Teacher.  Like the story of young Johnny for instance ( I swear on a stack of pancakes, the kid's name was Johnny.)  Johnny ran faster and kicked the ball farther and climbed the jungle gym more quickly than most of us.  No teacher was near enough to hear some of his more jealous school mates tell him it didn't matter what he could do because he was just a n*gger.  And for a while at every recess, the favorite game of a few was the taunting of n*gger Johnny.  He never retaliated, never got into fights over it, never even reported it.  Johnny just looked sad.  And then one day he was gone.  The teacher said he and his family had moved.  I thought 'Good for him.  Maybe his new school will be better.'  

That was my first ever taste of social injustice.  I remember feeling sad, angry, confused, and helpless all at the same time.  To this day I wonder what became of Johnny.  Did he grow up happy?  Was he embittered?  I could certainly see the sadness in his face about that ugliness.  Maybe he's out there having a great life.  I certainly hope so, but I still wonder if some of us had been more empathetic to his situation, could we have lessened the impact it surely had upon him.  Multiply that story by untold thousands across the nation and it's not a surprise it has taken and is still taking generations to heal the racial divide.

A few years later I was a junior high school student, as excited and nervous as everybody else to meet new people and experience a whole new structure of learning.  One of the new friends I made was a really sharp kid.  He was quick witted and funny and we hit it off really well.  I remember being excited about the cool things things we might enjoy together, thinking he could meet some of my pals and vice versa.  I remember telling about that excitement at home and how I was told it was really great to have met such a nice new friend, that it was good to have a new buddy to pal around with after school.  On the playground.  Or at the park.  Or anyplace but my house.  Don't invite him home for dinner, either.  Or to stay overnight.  My new friend was black.  It just wasn't done.

Of course, I never my told friend any of that.  And you know what?  I kind of got the same vibe from him.  Neither one of us ever suggested the possibility of sleepovers or invitations to dinners or the chance of getting together anywhere except for a short time after school.  And before you knew it, we were nothing more than acquaintances who would sheepishly nod and smile at each other in the hallways.  By the time we were in high school, we barely acknowledged each other's existence.  What if other people had possessed more empathy for the friendship of two young boys?  What if they had allowed that relationship to grow instead of suppressing it under the weight of social constraints?  I wonder what might have happened.  That young fella, by the way, grew up to become a distinguished federal judge in the state of Washington.  I'm happy for his success and regretful I couldn't experience more of his wisdom and friendship.

I guess the point of these stories is that a lack of empathy for your fellow beings can change a lot of circumstances.  Or maybe I just felt like relating those memories, I'm not sure.  What I am sure of is, while I was writing all of this, I took some breaks to see what y'all were doing and it turns out that many of you are still treating each other uncivilly, even as I type.  Why do y'all like to do that so much?  Can anybody explain that to me?  Does it give you pleasure?  I'm just asking, not scolding.  I honestly don't get it.  When I act that that (and I have on too many occasions) it always leaves me angry and unfulfilled.  Are you building yourselves up by tearing others down?  Do your indignations and differences of opinions really warrant the need for all this us vs. them behavior?  Are sarcasm and satire and debate without malice really beyond your capabilities?

Liberty has asked me to draft some new rules for his consideration that might stem the tide of these behaviors, but since we are both loathe to censor, I don't know what they yet might turn out to be.  I think maybe we only need one rule and maybe y'all could enforce it yourselves if you agree.  Treat each other the same way you would like to be treated.  Maybe that's too much to ask, but it shouldn't be.  

If you made it this far, thanks for reading and thanks for participating in the Lawrence Underground.
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#2
Sorry sir, but I have to say that empathy as well as irony are both wasted on the ignorant.
You are the wind beneath my wings, otherwise known as turbulence.
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#3
(07-09-2017, 11:06 PM)Riverdrifter Wrote: Sorry sir, but I have to say that empathy as well as irony are both wasted on the ignorant.

Maybe, but if we stop trying, what do we become?
May you build a ladder to the stars
And climb on every rung
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#4
The ABILITY to feel empathy...

Something I've given a lot of thought to, but still have to wonder.. is it an inability? Or is it hatred built up for the unlucky? Disrespect for others who haven't met your expectations? Some level of experience with someone who truly did have flawed characters? All of the above, and more? 

When we judge someone for not having empathy.... I think... therefore I yam.... uh... I mean, I think we need to understand our own limitations in KNOWING that their lack of empathy is a character flaw rather than something developed from various experiences. 

But heck, it's still fun to throw rocks at'em. I do it too. I keep hoping they will AT LEAST understand that they have a flawed empathy trait.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

If I don't answer when you talk to me or about me, that's likely because I have you on ignore.  Try to PM me. It won't let you PM me if I have you on ignore. There are other people, not members, who peruse this site. I want THEM to know why I don't reply to everyone who talks to or about me.
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#5
I think it's so much more. It's genetics, hormones, environments..  A narcissist cannot feel empathy, as many on the autism spectrum, flawed character or biology? 
We can't insert ourselves into the feelings and thoughts of others and still keep our sense of self. But if we don't try to grow from our own isolated position, will we ever be able to have a world that is inclusive to all? 
Yeah, we chunk rocks but we sure don't like it when they come flying back in our face.
May you build a ladder to the stars
And climb on every rung
Reply
#6
(07-09-2017, 10:35 PM)rockchalker52 Wrote: Part One

"What Unites Us: Reflections on Patriotism" is a recent book written by famed journalist, Dan Rather.  I haven't read it yet in its entirety, but I fully intend to after a good friend shared with me this excerpt on the importance of empathy.  If you choose not to read all of this soapbox posting, I hope you will at least read the excerpt from Rather's book and take a few moments to reflect on the role empathy has played in the advancement of humankind and how, sometimes, the lack of empathy has hindered it.

Here is an excerpt from the ...uh, excerpt, Rather's remembrance of the people in his boyhood depression era neighborhood helping each other in times of need:

"The neighborhood tried as best it could to help these families stay alive. If we had leftovers after supper, we would walk them across the street. One of my earliest impressions was taking that short journey with my father. You might think that these families were humiliated by the offerings, but there is no dignity in being hungry. And there was no judgment or disdain on the part of those offering assistance. No one wondered why those neighbors weren’t working, and no one passed moral judgments on their inability to fend for themselves. We understood that in life, some are dealt aces, some tens, and some deuces."

The author recalled a lesson he learned about motivations for such kindnesses:

"So I asked my mother why we gave those families gifts at Christmas when we ourselves didn’t have much. I remember then answering for myself: 
“It was because we felt sorry for them, right?"
“We do not feel sorry for them,” my mother said sternly. “We understand how they feel.” 
It was a lesson that is so seared in my mind, I can see her face and I can hear her tone of voice as if it were yesterday."

Mr. Rather offers more examples of depression era hardships and empathetic neighborly assistance.  They are stories that similarly occurred in countless neighborhoods all across the nation.  As noted in the excerpt, empathy builds community and communities strengthen a nation along with its resolve.  It is this resolve, underestimated by the WW2 axis powers who perceived America as weakened and vulnerable, that enabled our nation to empathize with the victims of totalitarianism and to rise up and defeat it.  America did so not just for the benefit of the United States, but also for the whole of humanity.  Our nation did it because it empathized.  The author goes on to write:

"Indeed, this sweep of empathy continued after the war. One of the best foreign policy efforts in American history was to help rebuild Europe and Japan. Our enemies became our friends through an acknowledgment of the common bonds of humanity." 

"Today, these kinds of empathetic programs are associated with big government bureaucracies. There are legitimate questions about the manner in which they operate, and they could probably be improved. It is undeniable that they still do good work in bringing more fairness and justice to our democracy, but the spirit of empathy with which they were created has been lost. Empathy is a deeply personal emotion. It is about the feeling one has for one’s fellow human beings. Transferring responsibilities to government is often necessary but it creates a distance between us and those who need help. And if this impulse is left unchecked, it absolves us from our own responsibility as citizens to form a more empathetic union with others."

Talking about post-war legislation such as the TVA, the WPA, the creation of the SEC and the FLSA (Fair Labor Standards Act) Mr Rather writes "...and I don’t think it is coincidental that this happened as the children of the Great Depression and World War II grew into adulthood."

He continues with, perhaps, the most important points of the excerpt:

"Today, these kinds of empathetic programs are associated with big government bureaucracies. There are legitimate questions about the manner in which they operate, and they could probably be improved. It is undeniable that they still do good work in bringing more fairness and justice to our democracy, but the spirit of empathy with which they were created has been lost. Empathy is a deeply personal emotion. It is about the feeling one has for one’s fellow human beings. Transferring responsibilities to government is often necessary but it creates a distance between us and those who need help. And if this impulse is left unchecked, it absolves us from our own responsibility as citizens to form a more empathetic union with others.

"... When we live in a self-selected bubble of friends, neighbors, and colleagues, it is too easy to forget how important it is to try to walk in the shoes of others."

"... Warren Buffett once speculated about what would happen if, before birth, a genie gave us the opportunity to choose the political, economic, and social system into which we would be born. “What’s the catch?” he said. “One catch — just before you emerge [from the womb] you have to go through a huge bucket with seven billion slips, one for each human. Dip your hand in and that is what you get — you could be born intelligent or not intelligent, born healthy or disabled, born black or white, born in the U. S. or in Bangladesh, etc. You have no idea which slip you will get. Not knowing which slip you are going to get, how would you design the world?”

It is a wonderful thought experiment that lays out a provocative case for empathy. Mr. Buffett calls his construct “the ovarian lottery.” Now, take a moment to imagine the most sanctimonious of our current national voices. Imagine those who lecture most loudly about morality and personal responsibility from the perch of privilege. Imagine those who blame the victims of discrimination and poverty. How would these men and women fare in such a lottery as Mr. Buffett outlines? What would their message be if they themselves had been born under far different circumstances? These people are in dire need of humility, a humility bathed in the refreshing waters of empathy. We can all afford to drink more from that spring as well."


* * *

Part Two

I am not a duplicitous person.  Sometimes I am reserved and don't shoot off my mouth until I have a sense of how people will react, but I am not duplicitous.  What you read or hear from me is without ulterior motive.  The older I get the less concerned I become about other people's judgement of my thoughts and opinions.  That is not to say I have no respect for the opinions of others nor intentions of malice in presenting my own.  I'm simply more comfortable with presenting them than I was in my youth.  Having said that, I want to share a couple of experiences that tie in nicely with Dan Rather's excerpt on empathy.  The only person I've told these to before is my spouse.

First, fast forward through my early years all the way to second grade.  I don't even remember what they teach you in second grade.  I think that's where we built upon the 1st grade Dick and Jane reading skills, maybe got introduced to Dr. Seuss and the supervision at recess eased up enough to where not everything we said was within earshot of Mrs. Teacher.  Like the story of young Johnny for instance ( I swear on a stack of pancakes, the kid's name was Johnny.)  Johnny ran faster and kicked the ball farther and climbed the jungle gym more quickly than most of us.  No teacher was near enough to hear some of his more jealous school mates tell him it didn't matter what he could do because he was just a n*gger.  And for a while at every recess, the favorite game of a few was the taunting of n*gger Johnny.  He never retaliated, never got into fights over it, never even reported it.  Johnny just looked sad.  And then one day he was gone.  The teacher said he and his family had moved.  I thought 'Good for him.  Maybe his new school will be better.'  

That was my first ever taste of social injustice.  I remember feeling sad, angry, confused, and helpless all at the same time.  To this day I wonder what became of Johnny.  Did he grow up happy?  Was he embittered?  I could certainly see the sadness in his face about that ugliness.  Maybe he's out there having a great life.  I certainly hope so, but I still wonder if some of us had been more empathetic to his situation, could we have lessened the impact it surely had upon him.  Multiply that story by untold thousands across the nation and it's not a surprise it has taken and is still taking generations to heal the racial divide.

A few years later I was a junior high school student, as excited and nervous as everybody else to meet new people and experience a whole new structure of learning.  One of the new friends I made was a really sharp kid.  He was quick witted and funny and we hit it off really well.  I remember being excited about the cool things things we might enjoy together, thinking he could meet some of my pals and vice versa.  I remember telling about that excitement at home and how I was told it was really great to have met such a nice new friend, that it was good to have a new buddy to pal around with after school.  On the playground.  Or at the park.  Or anyplace but my house.  Don't invite him home for dinner, either.  Or to stay overnight.  My new friend was black.  It just wasn't done.

Of course, I never my told friend any of that.  And you know what?  I kind of got the same vibe from him.  Neither one of us ever suggested the possibility of sleepovers or invitations to dinners or the chance of getting together anywhere except for a short time after school.  And before you knew it, we were nothing more than acquaintances who would sheepishly nod and smile at each other in the hallways.  By the time we were in high school, we barely acknowledged each other's existence.  What if other people had possessed more empathy for the friendship of two young boys?  What if they had allowed that relationship to grow instead of suppressing it under the weight of social constraints?  I wonder what might have happened.  That young fella, by the way, grew up to become a distinguished federal judge in the state of Washington.  I'm happy for his success and regretful I couldn't experience more of his wisdom and friendship.

I guess the point of these stories is that a lack of empathy for your fellow beings can change a lot of circumstances.  Or maybe I just felt like relating those memories, I'm not sure.  What I am sure of is, while I was writing all of this, I took some breaks to see what y'all were doing and it turns out that many of you are still treating each other uncivilly, even as I type.  Why do y'all like to do that so much?  Can anybody explain that to me?  Does it give you pleasure?  I'm just asking, not scolding.  I honestly don't get it.  When I act that that (and I have on too many occasions) it always leaves me angry and unfulfilled.  Are you building yourselves up by tearing others down?  Do your indignations and differences of opinions really warrant the need for all this us vs. them behavior?  Are sarcasm and satire and debate without malice really beyond your capabilities?

Liberty has asked me to draft some new rules for his consideration that might stem the tide of these behaviors, but since we are both loathe to censor, I don't know what they yet might turn out to be.  I think maybe we only need one rule and maybe y'all could enforce it yourselves if you agree.  Treat each other the same way you would like to be treated.  Maybe that's too much to ask, but it shouldn't be.  

If you made it this far, thanks for reading and thanks for participating in the Lawrence Underground.

This is an excellent article and Dan Rather's mom reminds me a lot of my dad. My dad also grew up in similar circumstances as Dan Rather. There were people from all kinds of backgrounds and cultures in his neighborhood. People did things for other people because they could - meaning that they had the ability to do so and felt a duty toward those in need. You help people out because you can.

He also felt you should stick up for folks and that you should speak out when something is wrong. I do both. And it doesn't matter to me if it is friend, foe or stranger.

However, a sense of empathy can be temporarily depleted when you see folks complain over and over and over and over about some behavior they don't like and then turn right around and do the same thing. It can be depleted when people are obviously being belittling and when called out for it, claim innocence. It can be depleted when it is a constant "us v. them" with no end in sight. There are many ways it can be depleted and it gets depressing when that happens.

It is why I have the positive news thread - for replenishment. People need to see empathy in action. Those who have a diminished capacity for it or lack it altogether don't give a sh*t about a police officer showing a teen how to tie a tie for prom. They don't give a sh*t about their language being demeaning to others. They don't give a sh*t about other people. They don't give a sh*t if some ducklings are rescued by a firefighter. They don't give a sh*t because they have diminished capacity or a complete lack of ability to do so.

Anyhow, thanks for sharing the article with everyone and thanks for opening yourself up to us. It takes a lot of courage to do that and I will always respect that.
"Some people have a way with words. Others...oh...not have way." - Steve Martin
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#7
I love so many things about this post. I've been thinking all day about how to respond. I am not a wordsmith like RC, so it takes me awhile and many edits to get what I want to say said...anyway here goes.


I'm not a great fan of Dan Rather, but I certainly liked this excerpt on empathy. I agree with RC that this quote is quite important to consider. (emphasis mine).
"Today, these kinds of empathetic programs are associated with big government bureaucracies. There are legitimate questions about the manner in which they operate, and they could probably be improved. It is undeniable that they still do good work in bringing more fairness and justice to our democracy, but the spirit of empathy with which they were created has been lost. Empathy is a deeply personal emotion. It is about the feeling one has for one’s fellow human beings. Transferring responsibilities to government is often necessary but it creates a distance between us and those who need help. And if this impulse is left unchecked, it absolves us from our own responsibility as citizens to form a more empathetic union with others."

I assist with the food pantry at our church, which we run a little differently than many pantries. Most of our clients receive some government assistance of some type. However, what we hear from them frequently, is that they like coming to our pantry because we interact with them and provide them with opportunities to make some choices in what they receive. Many of those living on the street say that our pantry is their lifeline. I don't believe they say that because of the food or items that they receive, but rather because of the interactions they experience. I recently read two different blogs concerning poverty and providing assistance. One spoke of poverty in rural Appalachia and the other of homelessness on city streets. The take away from both was that people experiencing poverty, homelessness, desperate circumstances, want to feel that someone is listening to them and caring about their situations more than just handing them a bag of food or clothing, or a bus pass. I think this is what Mr. Rather is speaking of when he says the "spirit of empathy....has been lost." 

For me that is the 'big picture"; that we apply Mr. Webster's definition of empathy, (the ability to understand and share the feelings of others) in addition to or instead of letting our bureaucracies do all the heavy lifting.

A concept related to empathy is that of theory of mind...which means that one can look outside her/himself to perceive that others have beliefs, intentions, desires different than her/his own. To me that is the "small picture" that creates conflict such as can be seen on this forum. When we are conceited enough to think that only our viewpoints or beliefs are the ones worth exploring or espousing we do injustice to the entire community, including ourselves. Debate is instructional and productive. I love a well constructed sarcastic comment or come-back, done in good spirit. However, many times what I read here are just mean-spirited attacks. 

Let's all work on our empathy skills, big picture and small picture. The world and the Underground might just be better off for it. 

I'm not preachin'....I'm just sayin'!
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#8
HBSue, I'd say your abilities as a wordsmith and your understanding of the empowering benefits of empathy take a back seat to no one.  Thanks very much for what you said.
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#9
Hillbilly Sue, great post. Thanks.

What I want to ask is this: Are there enough empathetic people in this country that nobody who is hungry, nobody who has no clothes to wear or only ragged and few clothes, nobody who needs shelter in a safe place... assuming all of these people are unable for any reason whatsoever to help themselves.... are there enough empathetic people who can and WILL and DO work to make sure there are no leftover people  in need?

I ask because I don't think there is. 

Which is why I believe government must help. 

I've been to churches all over numerous states and many of them do not have a program to help the needy... much less a reliable one that will not go out of business..., and can be counted on to be there every day and every night if they're needed. 

It seems to me that this country has more poor people by far than upper middle class or wealthy people. Serving their needs, I believe, would be beyond the ability of any organizations. They do great work, those who do it. Most don't. It is not reliable for food, clothing, and shelter, and certainly not reliable for medical help.  While a person can go to an ER, they can't go for preventative help.

I wonder how many people here know at least one person... someone they actually know or did know... but who died from the lack of money for preventative help. If we only know one... we know one too many. Government, again, is the only entity who can fix that. 

So, it's very important that we all have enough empathy to do what we can, but it's more important that our government do it because individual human beings cannot be relied upon to ALWAYS be there when needed.

Just my opinion. I feel it very strongly.

I loved your comment.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

If I don't answer when you talk to me or about me, that's likely because I have you on ignore.  Try to PM me. It won't let you PM me if I have you on ignore. There are other people, not members, who peruse this site. I want THEM to know why I don't reply to everyone who talks to or about me.
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#10
Empathy is a euphemism for Liberal Elitism.  

Empathy is not hoping someone gets a leading role in a remake of a movie classic based solely on his skin color.  There's another name for that.  Empathy is not creating wasteful and corrupt big government programs to make you feel good about yourselves so you feel justified in your virtue signaling.  Empathy is about giving peeps a hand-up, not a hand-out.   

Dims never stop.  The entire reason for your being revolves around empathy, diversity, nuance...everything but, you know, WORK.

It's an endless numbing indoctrination with no right or wrong unless you cross one of their ever-changing boundaries of what is acceptable. At that very point you find out there really IS right and wrong and you are wrong!

Nothing is ever good enough, ever.  No one is ever tolerant enough, ever, and no space is never safe enough, ever.  The only happiness is the results that happen when white people are marginalized.  But it's only temporary as new victimization will be identified very soon and the cycle repeats itself.

Glad we have a loudmouth like President Trump.  At least there is one loud voice punching a hole in this bubble of PC insanity and empathy.
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