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Chemical vs. Organic gardening
#1
Last year we decided to grow our container garden using mostly organic stuff.  Here and there we used a chemical fertilizer, like in my Ficus, but for the garden, we went strictly organic.  We had a good crop but I'm expecting this year will be better since it takes organic fertilizer some additional processing by microbes to be available to the plant.  Our microbes have been working all winter.

Chemical is a lot cheaper, but it's iffy whether you can reuse the soil.

My crowning achievement will be peppers of all sorts (maybe 10 sorts) grown outdoors hydroponically with a solar panel to provide energy to the pumps.  I might even use a windmill if I find one and can nerd it up to do something.


 
Winner.
Winner.

Chicken Dinner.


Reply
#2
Planting radishes: The problem(for the uninitiated) is the tiny seed. Instead of a row just rake out a small area in your garden for them. Take the packet of seed and dump it into a coffee can with some sand (2 cups?) in it. Mix well and scatter all over the plot and rake very lightly. When they come up, thin ruthlessly if needed. This also works for turnips. If you have a Seedalizer, they stitch in very neat rows of radishes and this is how I do them. You can buy them cheap at garage sales -if you can find one. http://www.earthway.com/product/1001-b-p...eeder.ashx
 
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#3
(03-20-2014, 09:52 PM)'Riverdrifter' Wrote: Planting radishes: The problem(for the uninitiated) is the tiny seed. Instead of a row just rake out a small area in your garden for them. Take the packet of seed and dump it into a coffee can with some sand (2 cups?) in it. Mix well and scatter all over the plot and rake very lightly. When they come up, thin ruthlessly if needed. This also works for turnips. If you have a Seedalizer, they stitch in very neat rows of radishes and this is how I do them. You can buy them cheap at garage sales -if you can find one. http://www.earthway.com/product/1001-b-p...eeder.ashx
 




 
Do you have extra radish and turnip plates? (Lettuce)

Do you use graphite/talc?
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#4
(03-20-2014, 09:57 PM)'RETICENT_IRREVERENT' Wrote:
(03-20-2014, 09:52 PM)'Riverdrifter' Wrote: Planting radishes: The problem(for the uninitiated) is the tiny seed. Instead of a row just rake out a small area in your garden for them. Take the packet of seed and dump it into a coffee can with some sand (2 cups?) in it. Mix well and scatter all over the plot and rake very lightly. When they come up, thin ruthlessly if needed. This also works for turnips. If you have a Seedalizer, they stitch in very neat rows of radishes and this is how I do them. You can buy them cheap at garage sales -if you can find one. http://www.earthway.com/product/1001-b-p...eeder.ashx
 





 
Do you have extra radish and turnip plates? (Lettuce)

Do you use graphite/talc?

 
I never use graphite and talc only when I get really chapped.

I've got all the plates. If you need them PM me but you can order from the gardenway website. They don't cost much.


 
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#5
Quote:I never use graphite and talc only when I get really chapped.

I've got all the plates. If you need them PM me but you can order from the gardenway website. They don't cost much.

What does all that mean?
Winner.
Winner.

Chicken Dinner.


Reply
#6
(03-22-2014, 06:49 PM)'Liberty' Wrote:
Quote:I never use graphite and talc only when I get really chapped.

I've got all the plates. If you need them PM me but you can order from the gardenway website. They don't cost much.

What does all that mean?

 

I have no idea about the graphite and talc.
I was just (trying to be) glib like most everybody else here.
The question was about the various planting plates for the seedalizer.

 
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#7
(03-22-2014, 11:32 PM)'Riverdrifter' Wrote:
(03-22-2014, 06:49 PM)'Liberty' Wrote:
Quote:I never use graphite and talc only when I get really chapped.

I've got all the plates. If you need them PM me but you can order from the gardenway website. They don't cost much.

What does all that mean?



 

I have no idea about the graphite and talc.
I was just (trying to be) glib like most everybody else here.
The question was about the various planting plates for the seedalizer.

 


 
The graphite and talc lubricated and helps seeds to flow in planters. In planters that had mechanical pickup fingers you would use a teaspoon of graphite for 2 units of seed.  In vaccum planters you use a cup of talc for 2 units of seed.  In those planters it helps the seeds flow and lubricated the plates and workings of the planter.
It helps the lettuce seeds flow and reduces their static cling if you use a smidgen of talc/graphite in the seeders we are talking about. They kind of work like a rotary grain leg, picking up a seed in a "bucket" and dropping it down a seed tube, spacing the seeds and depositing them at a uniform depth.

I broke down and bought some new plates, they cost more than what I paid for the seeder.


 

 
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#8
(03-23-2014, 08:52 PM)'RETICENT_IRREVERENT' Wrote:
(03-22-2014, 11:32 PM)'Riverdrifter' Wrote:
(03-22-2014, 06:49 PM)'Liberty' Wrote:
Quote:I never use graphite and talc only when I get really chapped.

I've got all the plates. If you need them PM me but you can order from the gardenway website. They don't cost much.

What does all that mean?




 

I have no idea about the graphite and talc.
I was just (trying to be) glib like most everybody else here.
The question was about the various planting plates for the seedalizer.

 



 
The graphite and talc lubricated and helps seeds to flow in planters. In planters that had mechanical pickup fingers you would use a teaspoon of graphite for 2 units of seed.  In vaccum planters you use a cup of talc for 2 units of seed.  In those planters it helps the seeds flow and lubricated the plates and workings of the planter.
It helps the lettuce seeds flow and reduces their static cling if you use a smidgen of talc/graphite in the seeders we are talking about. They kind of work like a rotary grain leg, picking up a seed in a "bucket" and dropping it down a seed tube, spacing the seeds and depositing them at a uniform depth.

I broke down and bought some new plates, they cost more than what I paid for the seeder.


 

 

 


I hope you bought the blank plate that you can customize yourself. This is because the sweet corn plates put down far too much seed. Block them shut by half with putty or whatever.
Rest of the plates do OK, in my view.

 
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#9
(03-23-2014, 09:17 PM)'Riverdrifter' Wrote:
(03-23-2014, 08:52 PM)'RETICENT_IRREVERENT' Wrote:
(03-22-2014, 11:32 PM)'Riverdrifter' Wrote:
(03-22-2014, 06:49 PM)'Liberty' Wrote:
Quote:I never use graphite and talc only when I get really chapped.

I've got all the plates. If you need them PM me but you can order from the gardenway website. They don't cost much.

What does all that mean?





 

I have no idea about the graphite and talc.
I was just (trying to be) glib like most everybody else here.
The question was about the various planting plates for the seedalizer.

 




 
The graphite and talc lubricated and helps seeds to flow in planters. In planters that had mechanical pickup fingers you would use a teaspoon of graphite for 2 units of seed.  In vaccum planters you use a cup of talc for 2 units of seed.  In those planters it helps the seeds flow and lubricated the plates and workings of the planter.
It helps the lettuce seeds flow and reduces their static cling if you use a smidgen of talc/graphite in the seeders we are talking about. They kind of work like a rotary grain leg, picking up a seed in a "bucket" and dropping it down a seed tube, spacing the seeds and depositing them at a uniform depth.

I broke down and bought some new plates, they cost more than what I paid for the seeder.


 

 


 


I hope you bought the blank plate that you can customize yourself. This is because the sweet corn plates put down far too much seed. Block them shut by half with putty or whatever.
Rest of the plates do OK, in my view.

 

 
I have used the sweet corn plates, they plant a population of about 22000.  That's a fine population by me.
 
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#10
(03-20-2014, 08:27 PM)'Liberty' Wrote: Last year we decided to grow our container garden using mostly organic stuff.  Here and there we used a chemical fertilizer, like in my Ficus, but for the garden, we went strictly organic.  We had a good crop but I'm expecting this year will be better since it takes organic fertilizer some additional processing by microbes to be available to the plant.  Our microbes have been working all winter.

Chemical is a lot cheaper, but it's iffy whether you can reuse the soil.

My crowning achievement will be peppers of all sorts (maybe 10 sorts) grown outdoors hydroponically with 
solar panels to provide energy to the pumps.  I might even use a windmill if I find one and can nerd it up to do something.


 


 



Yes organic gardening is bit expensive but still is time to save nature so we must use organic farming...

 
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