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Freedom of Religion
#1
The state of Indiana is catching some heat for it's newly enacted Freedom of Religion law.  Opponents say the law opens the door for discrimination against people whose lifestyles or ethnicities might not be in accordance with a given religious philosophy.  

What is the actual purpose of the law?  Is it redundant because of our religious freedom already established by the U.S. Constitution's first amendment?  Is religious freedom under assault?  
 

 
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#2
Can I demand that a catering company run by muslims prepare a pork dinner?

There have been several examples of businesses that have refused service (Weddings mostly) to gay couples. These businesses were fined and some just closed.

A recent example had a conservative activist attempt to purchase heterosexual friendly cakes (I don't know how he worded it?) at some gay owned bakeries and they refused to serve him.

Both sides need to get over it and avoid businesses that they don't want to associate with. If you're gay don't use a Christian bakery if it offends the business owners. If you're a Christian don't go to a business that discriminates against your beliefs.


 
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#3
Religion is used to trick, coerce,fool,beguile,or otherwise decieve the practioner so as to give advantage to those holding the collection plate.  If one truly believes in the teaching of the Nazerene they would do will remember what he said about praying public and churches not being made of stone or wood.  If these laws are being promoted by evengelical fundimentalist types you can bet your boots it is spuriously designed to cheat or screw some dis-enfrachised group over.  God told them to do it.  Or like Geraldine, the devil did.
 
Natural selection will never favor Evangelical misfits


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#4
No private business should be forced to serve anyone for any reason.  The turned away person can then let everyone know and that will end up costing the place business.  I know I practice that with No-Concealed Carry signs. 
 
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#5
(03-30-2015, 08:24 AM)'autie' Wrote: Religion is used to trick, coerce,fool,beguile,or otherwise decieve the practioner so as to give advantage to those holding the collection plate.  If one truly believes in the teaching of the Nazerene they would do will remember what he said about praying public and churches not being made of stone or wood.  If these laws are being promoted by evengelical fundimentalist types you can bet your boots it is spuriously designed to cheat or screw some dis-enfrachised group over.  God told them to do it.  Or like Geraldine, the devil did.
 

 
Or the opposite of that coin, the progressive (prog) religion will force itself upon you whether you want to go to their church or not. Pay your taxes so they can practice their form of benevolence in public assistance. I'll take Christian choice over prog coercion any day.




 
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#6
It is seemingly unnecessary due to the 1st amendment, and the obvious protections of religious freedom in that.

But, given other things, like the Civil Rights Act, there may be some grey areas and conflicts that haven't been sorted out yet.

If it were up to me, I'd probably draw the lines somewhat like this:  Religious freedom is the right to believe as you wish, worship as you wish, gather together with other like-minded believers, etc.  But it doesn't translate into being able to withhold services from people you disapprove of.

So, a Christian landlord doesn't have the right not to rent to gay people/couples, based on their disapproval of them.

They can still disapprove of them, of course, and gather together with others who share that view, and listen to ministers who preach against homosexuality, etc.

To me that combines the religious freedom of the 1st amendment with our anti-discrimination laws.

The only things I can find about gay friendly businesses not providing service to straight folks involves cases where people go to gay friendly bakeries and ask them to make a cake with the slogan "God hates gays" or something like that, and, in fact, the bakery didn't refuse to make the cake, they offered to make the cake and let the customer write the slogan, providing them everything they needed to do that. The folks at the bakery just didn't want that slogan in their handwriting.

I wonder if the anti-gay bakeries offered anything like that to the gay couples? It would mean baking the cakes, etc. but not putting gay couples' names on them, or something like that.

It does get difficult, though - imagine a Jewish catering company being asked to cater a Nazi event, or a black one asked to cater a KKK party.

I guess the issue will be decided more definitively if the SC ever takes a case involving a local anti-discrimination law that's challenged by a religious business owner.





 
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#7
It's called "American Exceptionalism". It is a sad commentary that if you have to resort to passing laws that discriminate and are hurtful to our citizens in order to defend or uphold your religion and morals, then I would argue that you do not have morals or religion that are worth defending.

Tim Cook said it well, "This isn’t a political issue. It isn’t a religious issue. This is about how we treat each other as human beings. Opposing discrimination takes courage. With the lives and dignity of so many people at stake, it’s time for all of us to be courageous."
May you build a ladder to the stars
And climb on every rung
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#8
Discriminating against a persons religious beliefs is ok?

 
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#9
Many (if not most) retail establishments have the "NO CONCEALED CARRY" sign in the front door. I see no difference if you want to come from a consistutional angle. What is that the Constitution says, something about the right to keep and bear arms, propped up by fairly new CCH laws in many states. So do we see the progressive left once again picking and choosing what goes or does not go in private business/enterprise?  
 
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#10
(03-30-2015, 11:11 AM)'Agent99' Wrote: Many (if not most) retail establishments have the "NO CONCEALED CARRY" sign in the front door. I see no difference if you want to come from a consistutional angle. What is that the Constitution says, something about the right to keep and bear arms, propped up by fairly new CCH laws in many states. So do we see the progressive left once again picking and choosing what goes or does not go in private business/enterprise?  
 

Where do you see these establishments?

 
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